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Quotable Quote

  Be wary of the man who urges an action in which he himself incurs no risk.
Joaquin Setani

 
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Are meetings the root of your organisational dysfunction?


1) Are you and your managers spending too much time in ineffective meetings?

If you can't reduce the time spent in meetings, you can at least make them more productive.  We can ensure that your meetings address strategic issues rather than operational ones, and the focus is always on the big picture.

2) Are you losing potential from your regular planning sessions?

Whether they are held annually or every 6 months, planning sessions are of high value and should therefore produce valuable results. Action Meetings can help you make the most of these meetings. Using an external facilitator frees up everyone on the team and allows them to engage fully in the content of the meeting, not the management of the meeting.

3) Are effective meetings the heart of an effective organisations?

Meetings are the glue of an organisation, a forum for members to communicate, plan, and share their visions for the future. The culture of an organisation is reflected in how the meetings are run. Action Meetings produces meetings that are participant owned, not chairperson owned, which means that the quality of the meeting is the duty of every participant.
This approach breeds accountability. The result is a goal which is a combination of everyone's visions. Furthermore, when meetings are meaningful and result in action it gives positive reinforcement that meetings produce results.

 

The Building Officials Institute of New Zealand holds executive meetings four times a year but found that they were always pressed for time. With the help of Action Meetings facilitators, they got through their 'impossible agenda' with time to spare.
 

What customers say

  One of the most useful training experiences I have had.  Was engaging and interesting, interactive and encouraging
Officer, Building and Consents, Wellington City Council
 

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